Running Through Time and Space


a compilation of thoughts, revelations or just plain moments of awe regarding this thing called architecture.

Homeground of The Owner

Homeground of The Owner

After ages of digging through the web, browsing, research and right-clicking, I’ve come to the following inferences:

  • Glass and wood have become very common building materials
  • Roof gardens are almost essential in every home, from landed residential homes, to apartment spaces, to holidays getaway homes, to skyscrapers and so on.
  • Straight lines and sharp shapes are preferred in many buildings, and buildings that are not razor straight, are extremely curvy.  Architecture likes the extremes when it comes to shapes.
  • Plants are becoming important again, almost every photo posted here contains at least one plant, usually more.  Perhaps we are realizing that we should never have killed so many of them, or that still seeing them around make us feel less guilty. Either way, architects are picking up on this and incorporating these leafy creatures into the buildings.
  • Strange buildings are naturally attention-grabbing, but it is the beautiful ones (or the extra-strange ones) that last
  • Interior designs have become very clutter-free, but for people to actually live in most of these places may be hard, as most human beings don’t have the self-control for such cleanliness
  • Open is attractive. Open spaces, revealed structures, large glass windows have all become very popular.

I don’t know if all modern buildings are like these, but I tried to look for different buildings, and I ended up finding so many similar buildings that fell under these criteria.

I will post a list of all the structures I covered later.

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To everyone reading this and following this blog, thank you for all your time and support.  The sites that I used to most during this process were:

ArchDaily

Dezeen

Google

But I also browsed plenty of stand-alone pages, short articles and write-ups, all of which have been given credit to, and there are many others out there.  The world, as going through these has proven, is full of possibilities.  Go forth and explore, and once again, thank you!

Feel free to message me any questions and comments :)

Superkilen, Copenhagen, Denmark

(BIG, Topotek1, SUPERFLEX, 2012)

  • Superkilen is a half-mile urban space that cuts through one of the most diverse neighborhoods in Denmark, functioning as a leisure park space with less trees.
  • the park contains artifacts from all over the world, all the more to promote and support the diverse-leaning culture of the neighborhood
  • the eclectic collection of park benches, street lamps, trashcans and other monuments make the park a very interesting walk, and capture the attention of people long enough to make them stay outdoors, a challenge in the modern day for many
  • there are little climbing obstacles and bike paths, in addition to simply the vast amount of space to walk and explore
  • "The Red Square" is a tourist marketplace, and will attract tourists for miles as they spot the entire block of red-painted streets
  • the walls of the buildings that face the street are also painted red to add a cohesiveness to the street
  • although red can be a very dominating color, the shades of reds, pinks and orange that make up the red square provide the warmth of brick and are pleasing to the eye despite the bright color

Image source

Modern House Design, envisioned in Ploiesti, Romania

(Stoica Mario)

  • the color scheme of the house is warm earthy tones and old metal
  • one thing i’ve noticed about the house is how it does not seem to be a big house, but the space is made good use of. the front corridor, the bathroom, the rooms are all narrow
  • the furniture and details have been arranged in such a way that there are no unnecessary embellishments that create clutter, but the house is not minimalistic either
  • the smallness of the house, instead of making the house look cramped, makes it look cozy instead, especially in the tucked away tv-room, pictured above
  • in the living room, there are large glass doors that make the space look bigger, and can be left open if there is a crowd in the living room for more space

Image source

"The Cube" and Water Tower, London, UK

The Water Tower (Fowler and Hill, 1877)

Home (Graham Voce & Leigh Osbourne, 2008)

  • the “cube” is very modern, which is a sharp contrast to the water tower, but also not surprising to look at, because a home built in a water tower itself is a radically modern idea
  • the house contains a roof pavilion to enjoy during the warmer months
  • on the interior, the spaces are bright, lively and clean, giving off the impression of a space that is a joy to live in. the impression that it gives to the public is of course very important, since the glass walls practically broadcast your lives to the entire street and everyone passing through
  • the spaces with glass walls are only the public areas, such as dining and living areas though, and the bedrooms and other more private rooms have the wall of the original wall tower still intact to protect privacy
  • higher up still, it goes back to being glass, but because no one else can look in, it is fine. the view from up there is also going to be really good, and a waste if not put to glass

Images source

Sumatrakontor, Hamburg, Germany

(Erick van Egeraat, 2011)

  • there shops on the ground floor of this building to attract people, welcoming them in to explore this intriguing skyscraper
  • the red curtains seem to suddenly fall open for passerbys as they hit the right angle on the sidewalk
  • the striped vertical lines give the sense of motion up and down, like when a curtain rises and falls
  • there are slits in the side of the building that go back to glass, possibly empty corridors within the building for transition between offices, and give the exterior a break from the vertical lines
  • the colour is warm and welcoming, attractive but also non-showy because it is brick, simple, convenient and sturdy
  • the building faces the harbor, reflects the sea in the turquoise-tinted one-way glass that points sharply inwards, and while it mask the outsiders from the inside, it invites the people within the building to look outside
  • from the inside of the building, the red does not show, so office workers will not be stressed by seeing the powerful color of red all over the place every day that they go to work

Image source

Inntel Hotel, Zaandam, Netherlands
(WAM Architecten, 2010)
the wooden green facades of Inntel Hotel are typical of houses in the area, so there is still a hint of tradition to them, but nothing else is typical about these houses
they are fitted together like an interesting balancing act of toy homes, and the fact that there are so many houses emphasize the function of the building as a hotel that can accommodate many kinds of people
there are so many windows in this building that it is almost overwhelming, the natural light flowing into the building is high, and the rooms will probably have a very bright and airy interior
the houses themselves vary in design, and some in color, roofs protrude and walls fall back, forming a very lively three-dimensional shape
the striking bright green color of the walls and bright orange roofs altogether make the hotel look very cheerful and welcoming, and brighten up the area it is in
on a side note, apparently houses in the area truly are the same shade of green, because the color was cheaper in the old days and continued until now for tradition’s sake
Image source

Inntel Hotel, Zaandam, Netherlands

(WAM Architecten, 2010)

  • the wooden green facades of Inntel Hotel are typical of houses in the area, so there is still a hint of tradition to them, but nothing else is typical about these houses
  • they are fitted together like an interesting balancing act of toy homes, and the fact that there are so many houses emphasize the function of the building as a hotel that can accommodate many kinds of people
  • there are so many windows in this building that it is almost overwhelming, the natural light flowing into the building is high, and the rooms will probably have a very bright and airy interior
  • the houses themselves vary in design, and some in color, roofs protrude and walls fall back, forming a very lively three-dimensional shape
  • the striking bright green color of the walls and bright orange roofs altogether make the hotel look very cheerful and welcoming, and brighten up the area it is in
  • on a side note, apparently houses in the area truly are the same shade of green, because the color was cheaper in the old days and continued until now for tradition’s sake

Image source

Yakisugi House (Charcoal House), Nagano, Japan

(Terunobu Fujimori, 2005-2007)

  •  the Yakisugi house was inspired by a cave, hence the cave-like entrance into the house
  • also like a cave, the house does not have many windows, but because it has to serve the function of a house, and having some natural lighting in the house is important, there are several strategically placed windows.  The windows have a wooden grid on them to prevent them house/ cave from looking too open.
  • the exterior walls of the house were made of charred cedar, but the timber warped during the building process, and the gaps were filled with plaster
  • the plaster against the cedar gives the house an interesting stripey look, perhaps even more interesting than the house would have been if the wood had not warped
  • on one side, the house appears to have a flat roof, but on the other side of the house, the roof is very steep
  • the angle the house is viewed from plays a big part in the design of the house. Apart from the roof’s steepness, from the front of the house it also appears as though the extension tea house is attached to the house by a tiny corner, although we see from the side that there is a bit more support to the tea house.
  • the materials of the house are mostly maintained in their original states, and make the house look very earthy, like a dwelling extended out from nature, a mixture of cave, wood and brick.

Image Source

Pit House, Okayama, Japan

(UID Architects, 2011)

  • I love the layout of the Pit House, the open spaces and the various levels within one floor, making the house a maze and a jungle-gym of sorts
  • the kitchen table is round like the house, and the kitchen very nicely wraps around the table, as are the rugs in the house
  • there is a strong relationship between the inside and the outside of the house due to the glass walls, and nature from outside is brought into the lounge area, with little pebbles and skinny trees
  • the railings on the second floor won’t play much a role in safety, but they are simplistic and functional at a bare minimum
  • the way the whole house is interconnected gives off the impression that the residents are fond of open spaces, an idea that is reinforced by the glass walls
  • the rooms aren’t rooms, more of just odd shapes combined together, and I like how even the first and second floor are connected by more than just the staircase
  • strangely enough, for a house so round on the inside, it looks like a block from the outside
  • inside and out, the Pit House is a sleek, elegant house, built with glass and wood and smooth in all the right ways
  • like the other modern interiors looked at, lightbulbs hang from the ceilings, simple and proud

Image source

Starbucks: The Bank, Amsterdam, Netherlands

(Liz Muller, 2012)

  • this starbucks branch in Netherlands incorporates local flavour, Dutch wood and artistic touches into the shop
  • it was built in the vault of a historic bank

The entire shop was designed to respect the architecture of the historic bank, but also to treat coffee as a theater. In fact, the store is constructed like a reversed theater; you can see the baristas the moment you enter the door, and as you move through the niches and platforms you never lose sight of them.

  • starbucks is a place to hang out, and this is cozy, friendly and comfortable, perfect for a group of friends to hang out or a casual business meeting
  • brightly lit, but with yellow lights to emphasize the warm, toasty feeling of coffee and pastries
  • the seating choices range from long tables to armchairs, to straight-backed wooden chairs, to benches and plastic chairs, there is something for everyone
  • there are various levels to the shop, depending on whether you want a more secluded location or a noisy, bustling area
  • the walls, tables, ceilings and counters are all made of or decorated with wood, advertising the brand as down-to-earth and reliable
  • wood is also a very cool material, and despite the toasty warm interior of the shop, using wood as a building material ensures the temperature will never get too warm during the summer months

Image and text source